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Jul 14

Center for Disease Control

Beware of the vampires! No, not that kind. These are hard to see and can give you Lyme disease. Ticks, especially the tiny nymphs, can attach to any part of the body. They generally need 36-48 hours to feed on your blood and can leave you with a parting gift ─ a red, expanding, rash! The rash won't hurt or itch but it can come with fatigue, chills, fever, and body aches. Lyme disease is treated with antibiotics. If you've been bitten by a tick, or have been in areas where ticks are common, and have an unexplained fever or rash, see your health care provider. read more

Jul 14

Center for Disease Control

Hot weather provides opportunities for kids to enjoy the outdoors. Take steps to keep them safe and healthy, both indoors and outdoors. read more

Jul 14

Center for Disease Control

When you're having fun outdoors, it's easy to forget how important it is to protect yourself from the sun. Unprotected skin can be damaged by the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays in as little as 15 minutes. It can take up to 12 hours for skin to show the full effect of sun exposure. Even if it's cool and cloudy, you still need protection—UV rays, not the temperature, do the damage. People with certain risk factors are more likely than others to develop skin cancer. These include family history, large number or unusual moles, fair skin, and exposure to sun or artificial ultraviolet light such as that found in tanning salons. read more

Jul 14

Center for Disease Control

Don't get in over your head and ignore a concussion. A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head. TBIs can also happen when a fall or blow to the body makes the head and brain move quickly back and forth. Even a "ding," "getting your bell rung," or a mild bump on the head can be serious. While most people with a concussion feel better within a couple of weeks, some will have symptoms that last for weeks or even longer. People with a concussion need to be seen by a medical professional. Getting help soon after the injury can help speed your recovery. read more

Jul 14

Center for Disease Control

This holiday season, let's eat! But let's eat safely. Don't let foodborne illness, sometimes known as "food poisoning," ruin your holiday plans. Whether you're in your kitchen or helping friends or family in theirs, follow the four simple steps to food safety—clean, separate, cook, and chill. Wash your hands and surfaces often, don't cross-contaminate, cook to the right temperature, and refrigerate promptly. read more


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